Monday, September 13, 2010

a question for Gospel Coalition

In today's post, Scot Mcnight is engaging the blogosphere on the issue of women in ministry. HT New Leaven

6 comments:

Don said...

From what I have seen, some non-egals are circling the wagons and doing their best to claim a coupling of the gospel with non-egalism. It does not look good.

Brian Krieger said...

Sue:

You may check your e-mail account. It might have been jacked. Just in case you didn't already know.

Suzanne McCarthy said...

Thanks. I know. I have changed my password, but I don't know if that will help.

scott gray said...

sue--

i thought your point on textual interpretations was spot on. which translation (or even which choices in wisdom texts/faith documents) an intentional community uses has both obvious and subtle effects on how hearers responds to the text.

scott

Suzanne McCarthy said...

Thanks Scott. That has been my central concern from the beginning.

scott gray said...

sue--

i'm working in a church that was founded by the person who is currently pastor, and soon to retire. it seems to me that faith communities are founded by charismatic or visionary leaders based on particular principles, and the community thrives within those principles as long as the leader is on the ground. as time passes, a structure evolves to meet particular responses by the community based on those principles.

when the charismatic leader retires, or dies, the community, the principles, and the structure are still there. if the follow-on leader(s) don't have the same charisma or vision, or savvy, or competence, it seems to me that the structure of the community becomes more complicated, often more restrictive, in order to compensate for lesser leadership.

i think this is what's at issue in the comp-egal debate. who gets to hold what hierarchical positions, and how, and when, are structural responses, reifications, to compensate for weak leaders. st. paul's leadership was certainly charismatic; jesus' as well. follow on leaders with less to offer needed structures to compensate for their shortcomings.

what do you think?

scott